Usage

The following function can be used to print data.

function pretty_table([io::IO | String,] table[, header::AbstractVecOrMat];  kwargs...)

Print to io the table table with header header. If conf is omitted, then the default configuration will be used. If io is omitted, then it defaults to stdout. If String is passed in the place of io, then a String with the printed table will be returned by the function.

The header can be a Vector or a Matrix. If it is a Matrix, then each row will be a header line. The first line is called header and the others are called sub-headers . If header is empty or missing, then it will be automatically filled with "Col. i" for the i-th column.

When printing, it will be verified if table complies with Tables.jl API. If it is is compliant, then this interface will be used to print the table. If it is not compliant, then only the following types are supported:

  1. AbstractVector: any vector can be printed. In this case, the header must be a vector, where the first element is considered the header and the others are the sub-headers.
  2. AbstractMatrix: any matrix can be printed.
  3. Dict: any Dict can be printed. In this case, the special keyword sortkeys can be used to select whether or not the user wants to print the dictionary with the keys sorted. If it is false, then the elements will be printed on the same order returned by the functions keys and values. Notice that this assumes that the keys are sortable, if they are not, then an error will be thrown.

The user can select which back-end will be used to print the tables using the keyword argument backend. Currently, the following back-ends are supported:

  1. Text (backend = :text): prints the table in text mode. This is the default selection if the keyword backend is absent.
  2. HTML (backend = :html): prints the table in HTML.
  3. LaTeX (backend = :latex): prints the table in LaTeX format.

Each back-end defines its own configuration keywords that can be passed using kwargs. However, the following keywords are valid for all back-ends:

  • alignment: Select the alignment of the columns (see the section Alignment.

  • backend: Select which back-end will be used to print the table. Notice that the additional configuration in kwargs... depends on the selected back-end.

  • cell_alignment: A tuple of functions with the signature f(data,i,j) that overrides the alignment of the cell (i,j) to the value returned by f. It can also be a single function, when it is assumed that only one alignment function is required, or nothing, when no cell alignment modification will be performed. If the function f does not return a valid alignment symbol as shown in section Alignment, then it will be discarded. For convenience, it can also be a dictionary of type (i,j) => a that overrides the alignment of the cell (i,j) to a. a must be a symbol like specified in the section Alignment.

    Note

    If more than one alignment function is passed to cell_alignment, then the functions will be evaluated in the same order of the tuple. The first one that returns a valid alignment symbol for each cell is applied, and the rest is discarded.

    (Default = nothing)

  • cell_first_line_only: If true, then only the first line of each cell will be printed. (Default = false)

  • compact_printing: Select if the option :compact will be used when printing the data. (Default = true)

  • filters_row: Filters for the rows (see the section Filters).

  • filters_col: Filters for the columns (see the section Filters).

  • formatters: See the section Formatters.

  • header_alignment: Select the alignment of the header columns (see the section Alignment. If the symbol that specifies the alignment is :s for a specific column, then the same alignment in the keyword alignment for that column will be used. (Default = :s)

  • header_cell_alignment: This keyword has the same structure of cell_alignment but in this case it operates in the header. Thus, (i,j) will be a cell in the header matrix that contains the header and sub-headers. This means that the data field in the functions will be the same value passed in the keyword header.

    Note

    If more than one alignment function is passed to header_cell_alignment, then the functions will be evaluated in the same order of the tuple. The first one that returns a valid alignment symbol for each cell is applied, and the rest is discarded.

    (Default = nothing)

  • limit_printing: If true, then the cells will be converted using the property :limit => true of IOContext. (Default = true)

  • renderer: A symbol that indicates which function should be used to convert an object to a string. It can be :print to use the function print or :show to use the function show. Notice that this selection is not applicable to the headers and sub-headers. They will always be converted using print. (Default = :print)

  • row_names: A vector containing the row names that will be appended to the left of the table. If it is nothing, then the column with the row names will not be shown. Notice that the size of this vector must match the number of rows in the table. (Default = nothing)

  • row_name_alignment: Alignment of the column with the rows name (see the section Alignment).

  • row_name_column_title: Title of the column with the row names. (Default = "")

  • row_number_column_title: The title of the column that shows the row numbers. (Default = "Row")

  • show_row_number: If true, then a new column will be printed showing the row number. (Default = false)

  • title: The title of the table. If it is empty, then no title will be printed. (Default = "")

  • title_alignment: Alignment of the title, which must be a symbol as explained in the section Alignment. This argument is ignored in the LaTeX backend. (Default = :l)

Note

Notice that all back-ends have the keyword tf to specify the table printing format. Thus, if the keyword backend is not present or if it is nothing, then the back-end will be automatically inferred from the type of the keyword tf. In this case, if tf is also not present, then it just fall-back to the text back-end.

Examples

In the following, it is possible to see some examples for a quick start using the text back-end.

julia> data = [1 2 3; 4 5 6];

julia> pretty_table(data, ["Column 1", "Column 2", "Column 3"])
┌──────────┬──────────┬──────────┐
│ Column 1 │ Column 2 │ Column 3 │
├──────────┼──────────┼──────────┤
│        1 │        2 │        3 │
│        4 │        5 │        6 │
└──────────┴──────────┴──────────┘

julia> pretty_table(data, ["Column 1" "Column 2" "Column 3"; "A" "B" "C"])
┌──────────┬──────────┬──────────┐
│ Column 1 │ Column 2 │ Column 3 │
│        A │        B │        C │
├──────────┼──────────┼──────────┤
│        1 │        2 │        3 │
│        4 │        5 │        6 │
└──────────┴──────────┴──────────┘

julia> str = pretty_table(String, data, ["Column 1", "Column 2", "Column 3"]);

julia> print(str)
┌──────────┬──────────┬──────────┐
│ Column 1 │ Column 2 │ Column 3 │
├──────────┼──────────┼──────────┤
│        1 │        2 │        3 │
│        4 │        5 │        6 │
└──────────┴──────────┴──────────┘
julia> dict = Dict(1 => "Jan", 2 => "Feb", 3 => "Mar", 4 => "Apr", 5 => "May", 6 => "Jun");

julia> pretty_table(dict)
┌───────┬────────┐
│  Keys │ Values │
│ Int64 │ String │
├───────┼────────┤
│     4 │    Apr │
│     2 │    Feb │
│     3 │    Mar │
│     5 │    May │
│     6 │    Jun │
│     1 │    Jan │
└───────┴────────┘

julia> pretty_table(dict, sortkeys = true)
┌───────┬────────┐
│  Keys │ Values │
│ Int64 │ String │
├───────┼────────┤
│     1 │    Jan │
│     2 │    Feb │
│     3 │    Mar │
│     4 │    Apr │
│     5 │    May │
│     6 │    Jun │
└───────┴────────┘

Configuration

The following function can be used to print a table changing the default configurations of PrettyTables.jl:

pretty_table_with_conf(conf::PrettyTablesConf, args...; kwargs...)

It calls pretty_table using the default configuration in conf. The args... and kwargs... can be the same as those passed to pretty_tables. Notice that all the configurations in kwargs... will overwrite the ones in conf.

The object conf can be created by the function set_pt_conf in which the keyword parameters can be any one supported by the function pretty_table as shown in the following.

julia> conf = set_pt_conf(tf = tf_markdown, alignment = :c);

julia> data = [1 2 3; 4 5 6];

julia> header = ["Column 1" "Column 2" "Column 3"];

julia> pretty_table_with_conf(conf, data, header)
| Column 1 | Column 2 | Column 3 |
|----------|----------|----------|
|    1     |    2     |    3     |
|    4     |    5     |    6     |

A configuration object can be modified by the function set_pt_conf! and cleared by the function clear_pt_conf!.

Helpers

The macro @pt was created to make it easier to pretty print tables to stdout. Its signature is:

macro pt(expr...)

where the expression list expr contains the tables that should be printed like:

@pt table1 table2 table3

The user can select the table header by passing the expression:

:header = [<Vector with the header>]

Notice that the header is valid only for the next printed table. Hence:

    @pt :header = header1 table1 :header = header2 table2 table3

will print table1 using header1, table2 using header2, and table3 using the default header.

The global configurations used to print tables with the macro @pt can be selected by:

macro ptconf(expr...)

where expr format must be:

keyword1 = value1 keyword2 = value2 ...

The keywords can be any possible keyword that can be used in the function pretty_table.

All the configurations can be reseted by calling @ptconfclean.

Warning

If a keyword is not supported by the function pretty_table, then no error message is printed when calling @ptconf. However, an error will be thrown when @pt is called.

Info

When more than one table is passed to the macro @pt, then multiple calls to pretty_table will occur. Hence, the cropping algorithm will behave exactly the same as printing the tables separately.

julia> data = [1 2 3; 4 5 6];

julia> @pt data
┌────────┬────────┬────────┐
│ Col. 1 │ Col. 2 │ Col. 3 │
├────────┼────────┼────────┤
│      1 │      2 │      3 │
│      4 │      5 │      6 │
└────────┴────────┴────────┘

julia> @pt :header = ["Column 1", "Column 2", "Column 3"] data :header = ["Column 1" "Column 2" "Column 3"; "A" "B" "C"] data
┌──────────┬──────────┬──────────┐
│ Column 1 │ Column 2 │ Column 3 │
├──────────┼──────────┼──────────┤
│        1 │        2 │        3 │
│        4 │        5 │        6 │
└──────────┴──────────┴──────────┘
┌──────────┬──────────┬──────────┐
│ Column 1 │ Column 2 │ Column 3 │
│        A │        B │        C │
├──────────┼──────────┼──────────┤
│        1 │        2 │        3 │
│        4 │        5 │        6 │
└──────────┴──────────┴──────────┘

julia> @ptconf tf = tf_ascii_dots alignment = :c

julia> @pt data
............................
: Col. 1 : Col. 2 : Col. 3 :
:........:........:........:
:   1    :   2    :   3    :
:   4    :   5    :   6    :
:........:........:........:

julia> @ptconfclean

julia> @pt data
┌────────┬────────┬────────┐
│ Col. 1 │ Col. 2 │ Col. 3 │
├────────┼────────┼────────┤
│      1 │      2 │      3 │
│      4 │      5 │      6 │
└────────┴────────┴────────┘