Text back-end

The following options are available when the text backend is used. Those can be passed as keywords when calling the function pretty_table:

  • border_crayon: Crayon to print the border.

  • header_crayon: Crayon to print the header.

  • subheader_crayon: Crayon to print sub-headers.

  • rownum_header_crayon: Crayon for the header of the column with the row numbers.

  • text_crayon: Crayon to print default text.

  • alignment_anchor_fallback: This keyword controls the line alignment when using the regex alignment anchors if a match is not found. If it is :l, then the left of the line will be aligned with the anchor. If it is :c, then the line center will be aligned with the anchor. Otherwise, the end of the line will be aligned with the anchor. (Default = :l)

  • alignment_anchor_fallback_override: A Dict{Int, Symbol} to override the behavior of fallback_alignment_anchor for a specific column. Example: Dict(3 => :c) changes the fallback alignment anchor behavior for :c only for the column 3.

  • alignment_anchor_regex: A dictionary Dict{Int, AbstractVector{Regex}} with a set of regexes that is used to align the values in the columns (keys). The characters at the first regex match (or anchor) of each line in every cell of the column will be aligned. The regex match is searched in the same order as the regexes appear on the vector. The regex matching is applied after the cell conversion to string, which includes the formatters. If no match is found for a specific line, then the alignment of this line depends on the options alignment_anchor_fallback and alignment_anchor_fallback_override. If the key 0 is present, then the related regexes will be used to align all the columns. In this case, all the other keys will be neglected. Example: Dict(2 => [r"\\."]) aligns the decimal point of the cells in the second column. (Default = Dict{Int, Vector{Regex}}())

  • autowrap: If true, then the text will be wrapped on spaces to fit the column. Notice that this function requires linebreaks = true and the column must have a fixed size (see columns_width).

  • body_hlines: A vector of Int indicating row numbers in which an additional horizontal line should be drawn after the row. Notice that numbers lower than 1 and equal or higher than the number of printed rows will be neglected. This vector will be appended to the one in hlines, but the indices here are related to the printed rows of the body. Thus, if 1 is added to body_hlines, then a horizontal line will be drawn after the first data row. (Default = Int[])

  • body_hlines_format: A tuple of 4 characters specifying the format of the horizontal lines that will be drawn by body_hlines. The characters must be the left intersection, the middle intersection, the right intersection, and the row. If it is nothing, then it will use the same format specified in tf. (Default = nothing)

  • cell_alignment: A dictionary of type (i,j) => a that overrides that alignment of the cell (i,j) to a regardless of the columns alignment selected. a must be a symbol like specified in the section Alignment.

  • columns_width: A set of integers specifying the width of each column. If the width is equal or lower than 0, then it will be automatically computed to fit the large cell in the column. If it is a single integer, then this number will be used as the size of all columns. (Default = 0)

  • continuation_row_alignment: A symbol that defines the alignment of the cells in the continuation row. This row is printed if the table is vertically cropped. (Default = :c)

  • crop: Select the printing behavior when the data is bigger than the available display size (see display_size). It can be :both to crop on vertical and horizontal direction, :horizontal to crop only on horizontal direction, :vertical to crop only on vertical direction, or :none to do not crop the data at all. If the io has :limit => true, then crop is set to :both by default. Otherwise, it is set to :none by default.

  • crop_num_lines_at_beginning: Number of lines to be left at the beginning of the printing when vertically cropping the output. Notice that the lines required to show the title are automatically computed. (Default = 0)

  • crop_subheader: If true, then the sub-header size will not be taken into account when computing the column size. Hence, the print algorithm can crop it to save space. This has no effect if the user selects a fixed column width. (Default = false)

  • display_size: A tuple of two integers that defines the display size (num. of rows, num. of columns) that is available to print the table. It is used to crop the data depending on the value of the keyword crop. Notice that if a dimension is not positive, then it will be treated as unlimited. (Default = displaysize(io))

  • ellipsis_line_skip: An integer defining how many lines will be skipped from showing the ellipsis that indicates the text was cropped. (Default = 0)

  • equal_columns_width: If true, then all the columns will have the same width. (Default = false)

  • filters_row: Filters for the rows (see the section Filters).

  • filters_col: Filters for the columns (see the section Filters).

  • highlighters: An instance of Highlighter or a tuple with a list of highlighters (see the section Text highlighters).

  • hlines: This variable controls where the horizontal lines will be drawn. It can be nothing, :all, :none or a vector of integers.

    • If it is nothing, which is the default, then the configuration will be obtained from the table format in the variable tf (see TextFormat).
    • If it is :all, then all horizontal lines will be drawn.
    • If it is :none, then no horizontal line will be drawn.
    • If it is a vector of integers, then the horizontal lines will be drawn only after the rows in the vector. Notice that the top line will be drawn if 0 is in hlines, and the header and subheaders are considered as only 1 row. Furthermore, it is important to mention that the row number in this variable is related to the printed rows. Thus, it is affected by filters, and by the option to suppress the header noheader. Finally, for convenience, the top and bottom lines can be drawn by adding the symbols :begin and :end to this vector, respectively, and the line after the header can be drawn by adding the symbol :header.
    Info

    The values of body_hlines will be appended to this vector. Thus, horizontal lines can be drawn even if hlines is :none.

    (Default = nothing)

  • linebreaks: If true, then \n will break the line inside the cells. (Default = false)

  • maximum_columns_width: A set of integers specifying the maximum width of each column. If the width is equal or lower than 0, then it will be ignored. If it is a single integer, then this number will be used as the maximum width of all columns. Notice that the parameter columns_width has precedence over this one. (Default = 0)

  • minimum_columns_width: A set of integers specifying the minimum width of each column. If the width is equal or lower than 0, then it will be ignored. If it is a single integer, then this number will be used as the minimum width of all columns. Notice that the parameter columns_width has precedence over this one. (Default = 0)

  • newline_at_end: If false, then the table will not end with a newline character. (Default = true)

  • noheader: If true, then the header will not be printed. Notice that all keywords and parameters related to the header and sub-headers will be ignored. (Default = false)

  • nosubheader: If true, then the sub-header will not be printed, i.e. the header will contain only one line. Notice that this option has no effect if noheader = true. (Default = false)

  • omitted_cell_summary_crayon: Crayon used to print the omitted cell summary.

  • overwrite: If true, then the same number of lines in the printed table will be deleted from the output io. This can be used to update the table in the display continuously. (Default = false)

  • row_number_alignment: Select the alignment of the row number column (see the section Alignment). (Default = :r)

  • show_omitted_cell_summary: If true, then a summary will be printed after the table with the number of columns and rows that were omitted. (Default = true)

  • title_autowrap: If true, then the title text will be wrapped considering the title size. Otherwise, lines larger than the title size will be cropped. (Default = false)

  • title_crayon: Crayon to print the title.

  • title_same_width_as_table: If true, then the title width will match that of the table. Otherwise, the title size will be equal to the display width. (Default = false)

  • tf: Table format used to print the table (see the section Text table formats). (Default = tf_unicode)

  • vcrop_mode: This variable defines the vertical crop behavior. If it is :bottom, then the data, if required, will be cropped in the bottom. On the other hand, if it is :middle, then the data will be cropped in the middle if necessary. (Default = :bottom)

  • vlines: This variable controls where the vertical lines will be drawn. It can be nothing, :all, :none or a vector of integers.

    • If it is nothing, which is the default, then the configuration will be obtained from the table format in the variable tf (see TextFormat).
    • If it is :all, then all vertical lines will be drawn.
    • If it is :none, then no vertical line will be drawn.
    • If it is a vector of integers, then the vertical lines will be drawn only after the columns in the vector. Notice that the top line will be drawn if 0 is in vlines. Furthermore, it is important to mention that the column number in this variable is related to the printed column. Thus, it is affected by filters, and by the options row_names and show_row_number. Finally, for convenience, the left and right vertical lines can be drawn by adding the symbols :begin and :end to this vector, respectively, and the line after the header can be drawn by adding the symbol :header.

    (Default = nothing)

The keywords header_crayon and subheader_crayon can be a Crayon or a Vector{Crayon}. In the first case, the Crayon will be applied to all the elements. In the second, each element can have its own crayon, but the length of the vector must be equal to the number of columns in the data.

Note

If the renderer show is used, then all strings will be printed with surrounding quotes. However, if a formatter modifies a value and return a string, then those surrounding quotes will be removed if the original value is not a string.

Crayons

A Crayon is an object that handles a style for text printed on terminals. It is defined in the package Crayons.jl. There are many options available to customize the style, such as foreground color, background color, bold text, etc.

A Crayon can be created in two different ways:

julia> Crayon(foreground = :blue, background = :black, bold = :true)

julia> crayon"blue bg:black bold"

For more information, see the Crayon.jl documentation.

Info

The Crayon.jl package is re-exported by PrettyTables.jl. Hence, you do not need using Crayons to create a Crayon.

Cropping

The keyword crop can be used to define how the output will be cropped if the display has limits. The default behavior depends on the property :limit of the io. If io has :limit => true, the default value of crop is :both. Otherwise, if :limit => false or it is not defined at all, then crop defaults to :none.

If pretty_table is called without io, then stdout is wrapped in a IOContext with :limit => true.

The display size can be configured by the keyword display_size, which is a tuple of two Int with the number of rows and columns, respectively. If this keyword is not specified, then it is automatically obtained using the function displaysize(io).

julia> data = Any[1    false      1.0     0x01 ;
                  2     true      2.0     0x02 ;
                  3    false      3.0     0x03 ;
                  4     true      4.0     0x04 ;
                  5    false      5.0     0x05 ;
                  6     true      6.0     0x06 ;];

julia> pretty_table(data, display_size = (11,30))
┌────────┬────────┬────────┬──
│ Col. 1 │ Col. 2 │ Col. 3 │ ⋯
├────────┼────────┼────────┼──
│      1 │  false │    1.0 │ ⋯
│      2 │   true │    2.0 │ ⋯
│      3 │  false │    3.0 │ ⋯
│   ⋮    │   ⋮    │   ⋮    │ ⋱
└────────┴────────┴────────┴──
   1 column and 3 rows omitted

julia> pretty_table(data, display_size = (11,30), crop = :none)
┌────────┬────────┬────────┬────────┐
│ Col. 1 │ Col. 2 │ Col. 3 │ Col. 4 │
├────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┤
│      1 │  false │    1.0 │      1 │
│      2 │   true │    2.0 │      2 │
│      3 │  false │    3.0 │      3 │
│      4 │   true │    4.0 │      4 │
│      5 │  false │    5.0 │      5 │
│      6 │   true │    6.0 │      6 │
└────────┴────────┴────────┴────────┘
Note

In vertical cropping, the header and the first table row is always printed.

Note

The highlighters will work even in partially printed data.

If the user selects a fixed size for the columns (using the keyword columns_width), enables line breaks (using the keyword linebreaks), and sets autowrap = true, then the algorithm wraps the text on spaces to automatically fit the space.

julia> data = ["One very very very big long long line"; "Another very very very big big long long line"];

julia> pretty_table(data, columns_width = 10, autowrap = true, linebreaks = true, show_row_number = true)
┌─────┬────────────┐
│ Row │     Col. 1 │
├─────┼────────────┤
│   1 │   One very │
│     │  very very │
│     │   big long │
│     │  long line │
│   2 │    Another │
│     │  very very │
│     │   very big │
│     │   big long │
│     │  long line │
└─────┴────────────┘

It is also possible to change the vertical cropping behavior to crop the table in the middle instead of the bottom. This can be accomplished by passing the option vcrop_mode = :middle to pretty_table:

julia> data = Any[1    false      1.0     0x01 ;
                  2     true      2.0     0x02 ;
                  3    false      3.0     0x03 ;
                  4     true      4.0     0x04 ;
                  5    false      5.0     0x05 ;
                  6     true      6.0     0x06 ;];

julia> pretty_table(data, display_size = (11,30), vcrop_mode = :middle)
┌────────┬────────┬────────┬──
│ Col. 1 │ Col. 2 │ Col. 3 │ ⋯
├────────┼────────┼────────┼──
│      1 │  false │    1.0 │ ⋯
│      2 │   true │    2.0 │ ⋯
│   ⋮    │   ⋮    │   ⋮    │ ⋱
│      6 │   true │    6.0 │ ⋯
└────────┴────────┴────────┴──
   1 column and 3 rows omitted

Text highlighters

A set of highlighters can be passed as a Tuple to the highlighters keyword. Each highlighter is an instance of the structure Highlighter that contains three fields:

  • f: Function with the signature f(data,i,j) in which should return true if the element (i,j) in data must be highlighter, or false otherwise.
  • fd: Function with the signature f(h,data,i,j) in which h is the highlighter. This function must return the Crayon to be applied to the cell that must be highlighted.
  • crayon: The Crayon to be applied to the highlighted cell if the default fd is used.

The function f has the following signature:

f(data, i, j)

in which data is a reference to the data that is being printed, and i and j are the element coordinates that are being tested. If this function returns true, then the cell (i,j) will be highlighted.

If the function f returns true, then the function fd(h,data,i,j) will be called and must return a Crayon that will be applied to the cell.

A highlighter can be constructed using three helpers:

Highlighter(f::Function; kwargs...)

where it will construct a Crayon using the keywords in kwargs and apply it to the highlighted cell,

Highlighter(f::Function, crayon::Crayon)

where it will apply the crayon to the highlighted cell, and

Highlighter(f::Function, fd::Function)

where it will apply the Crayon returned by the function fd to the highlighted cell.

Info

If only a single highlighter is wanted, then it can be passed directly to the keyword highlighter without being inside a Tuple.

Note

If multiple highlighters are valid for the element (i,j), then the applied style will be equal to the first match considering the order in the tuple highlighters.

Note

If the highlighters are used together with Formatters, then the change in the format will not affect the parameter data passed to the highlighter function f. It will always receive the original, unformatted value.

julia> data = Any[ f(a) for a = 0:15:90, f in (sind,cosd,tand) ]

julia> h1 = Highlighter( f      = (data,i,j) -> (data[i,j] < 0.5),
                         crayon = crayon"red bold" )

julia> h2 = Highlighter( (data,i,j) -> (data[i,j] > 0.5),
                         bold       = true,
                         foreground = :blue )

julia> h3 = Highlighter( f      = (data,i,j) -> (data[i,j] == 0.5),
                         crayon = Crayon(bold = true, foreground = :yellow) )

julia> pretty_table(data, highlighters = (h1, h2, h3), compact_printing = false)

julia> data = Any[ f(a) for a = 0:15:90, f in (sind,cosd,tand) ]

julia> hl_odd = Highlighter( f      = (data,i,j) -> i % 2 == 0,
                             crayon = Crayon(background = :light_blue))

julia> pretty_table(data, highlighters = hl_odd, formatters = ft_printf("%10.5f"))

There are a set of pre-defined highlighters (with names hl_*) to make the usage simpler. They are defined in the file ./src/backends/text/predefined_highlighters.jl.

Text table formats

The following table formats are available when using the text back-end:

tf_unicode (Default)

┌────────┬────────┬────────┬────────┐
│ Col. 1 │ Col. 2 │ Col. 3 │ Col. 4 │
├────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┤
│      1 │  false │    1.0 │      1 │
│      2 │   true │    2.0 │      2 │
│      3 │  false │    3.0 │      3 │
└────────┴────────┴────────┴────────┘

tf_ascii_dots

.....................................
: Col. 1 : Col. 2 : Col. 3 : Col. 4 :
:........:........:........:........:
:      1 :  false :    1.0 :      1 :
:      2 :   true :    2.0 :      2 :
:      3 :  false :    3.0 :      3 :
:........:........:........:........:

tf_ascii_rounded

.--------.--------.--------.--------.
| Col. 1 | Col. 2 | Col. 3 | Col. 4 |
:--------+--------+--------+--------:
|      1 |  false |    1.0 |      1 |
|      2 |   true |    2.0 |      2 |
|      3 |  false |    3.0 |      3 |
'--------'--------'--------'--------'

tf_borderless

  Col. 1   Col. 2   Col. 3   Col. 4

       1    false      1.0        1
       2     true      2.0        2
       3    false      3.0        3

tf_compact

 -------- -------- -------- --------
  Col. 1   Col. 2   Col. 3   Col. 4
 -------- -------- -------- --------
       1    false      1.0        1
       2     true      2.0        2
       3    false      3.0        3
 -------- -------- -------- --------

tf_dataframe

│ Col. 1 │ Col. 2 │ Col. 3 │ Col. 4 │
├────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┤
│      1 │  false │    1.0 │      1 │
│      2 │   true │    2.0 │      2 │
│      3 │  false │    3.0 │      3 │

tf_markdown

| Col. 1 | Col. 2 | Col. 3 | Col. 4 |
|--------|--------|--------|--------|
|      1 |  false |    1.0 |      1 |
|      2 |   true |    2.0 |      2 |
|      3 |  false |    3.0 |      3 |

tf_matrix

┌                     ┐
│ 1   false   1.0   1 │
│ 2    true   2.0   2 │
│ 3   false   3.0   3 │
└                     ┘
Info

In this case, the table format matrix was printed with the option noheader = true.

tf_mysql

+--------+--------+--------+--------+
| Col. 1 | Col. 2 | Col. 3 | Col. 4 |
+--------+--------+--------+--------+
|      1 |  false |    1.0 |      1 |
|      2 |   true |    2.0 |      2 |
|      3 |  false |    3.0 |      3 |
+--------+--------+--------+--------+

tf_simple

========= ======== ======== =========
  Col. 1   Col. 2   Col. 3   Col. 4
========= ======== ======== =========
       1    false      1.0        1
       2     true      2.0        2
       3    false      3.0        3
========= ======== ======== =========

tf_unicode_rounded

╭────────┬────────┬────────┬────────╮
│ Col. 1 │ Col. 2 │ Col. 3 │ Col. 4 │
├────────┼────────┼────────┼────────┤
│      1 │  false │    1.0 │      1 │
│      2 │   true │    2.0 │      2 │
│      3 │  false │    3.0 │      3 │
╰────────┴────────┴────────┴────────╯
Note

The format unicode_rounded should look awful on your browser, but it should be printed fine on your terminal.

julia> data = Any[ f(a) for a = 0:15:90, f in (sind,cosd,tand)];

julia> pretty_table(data, tf = tf_ascii_dots)
..................................
:   Col. 1 :   Col. 2 :   Col. 3 :
:..........:..........:..........:
:      0.0 :      1.0 :      0.0 :
: 0.258819 : 0.965926 : 0.267949 :
:      0.5 : 0.866025 :  0.57735 :
: 0.707107 : 0.707107 :      1.0 :
: 0.866025 :      0.5 :  1.73205 :
: 0.965926 : 0.258819 :  3.73205 :
:      1.0 :      0.0 :      Inf :
:..........:..........:..........:

julia> pretty_table(data, tf = tf_compact)
 ---------- ---------- ----------
    Col. 1     Col. 2     Col. 3
 ---------- ---------- ----------
       0.0        1.0        0.0
  0.258819   0.965926   0.267949
       0.5   0.866025    0.57735
  0.707107   0.707107        1.0
  0.866025        0.5    1.73205
  0.965926   0.258819    3.73205
       1.0        0.0        Inf
 ---------- ---------- ----------

It is also possible to define you own custom table by creating a new instance of the structure TextFormat. For example, let's say that you want a table like simple that does not print the bottom line:

julia> data = Any[ f(a) for a = 0:15:90, f in (sind,cosd,tand)];

julia> tf = TextFormat(up_right_corner     = '=',
                       up_left_corner      = '=',
                       bottom_left_corner  = '=',
                       bottom_right_corner = '=',
                       up_intersection     = ' ',
                       left_intersection   = '=',
                       right_intersection  = '=',
                       middle_intersection = ' ',
                       bottom_intersection  = ' ',
                       column              = ' ',
                       row                 = '=',
                       hlines              = [:begin,:header]);

julia> pretty_table(data, tf = tf)
=========== ========== ===========
    Col. 1     Col. 2     Col. 3
=========== ========== ===========
       0.0        1.0        0.0
  0.258819   0.965926   0.267949
       0.5   0.866025    0.57735
  0.707107   0.707107        1.0
  0.866025        0.5    1.73205
  0.965926   0.258819    3.73205
       1.0        0.0        Inf

or that does not print the header line:

julia> data = Any[ f(a) for a = 0:15:90, f in (sind,cosd,tand)];

julia> tf = TextFormat(up_right_corner     = '=',
                       up_left_corner      = '=',
                       bottom_left_corner  = '=',
                       bottom_right_corner = '=',
                       up_intersection     = ' ',
                       left_intersection   = '=',
                       right_intersection  = '=',
                       middle_intersection = ' ',
                       bottom_intersection  = ' ',
                       column              = ' ',
                       row                 = '=',
                       hlines              = [:begin,:end]);

julia> pretty_table(data, tf = tf)
=========== ========== ===========
    Col. 1     Col. 2     Col. 3
       0.0        1.0        0.0
  0.258819   0.965926   0.267949
       0.5   0.866025    0.57735
  0.707107   0.707107        1.0
  0.866025        0.5    1.73205
  0.965926   0.258819    3.73205
       1.0        0.0        Inf
=========== ========== ===========

For more information, see the documentation of the structure TextFormat.